... Latin[*]
The history of the alphabet known today as the Latin alphabet has gone through many cultures. The Phoenicians, Etruscs, Greeks, and finally the Romans all had their significant influence on the alphabet before it was adopted by the Christian church whose Roman Catholic wing kept it going until the invention of mechanical printing and subsequent explosive growth of written text as a communications medium. Thus, it is somewhat a matter of taste or preference which culture we name the alphabet after. Roman and Latin are the most common names we have encountered.
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... Unistroke[*]
To avoid confusion, I will use capital U when referring to the Unistroke alphabet described in the original paper [Goldberg and Richardson1993]. Unistroke without capital U refers to unistrokes in general.
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... Computing[*]
Later bought by USRobotics and currently a part of 3Com.
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... sparingly[*]
A special version of Huffman's algorithm or some other algorithm for generating optimal prefix codes would do this automatically. However, because we have rejected automatic code generation, we must manually keep the code close to optimum.
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poika@cs.uta.fi